Carion

Month

Biography

In 2002 five young virtuoso wind players created the woodwind quintet Carion from a shared vision of what chamber music might become. A dream of perfecting and developing the performance of wind chamber music binds these musicians together.

From the birth of the ensemble, the members of Carion have sought to convert the traditions of conventional chamber music into an up-to-date and appealing experience of high cultural value. They form an unusually cohesive ensemble that performs classical masterpieces in a way that is accessible to a wide variety of audiences.

To accomplish this Carion has developed a unique style where all works are performed from memory. The absence of music stands gives the musicians great freedom to communicate with one another and with the audience. It also allows a musically based choreography that reveals the inner architecture of the pieces, adding a dimension to the concert experience which makes even the avant-garde part of the repertoire readily accessible.

Carion has an on-going collaboration with the electronica guru Bjørn Svin. This collaboration has gained great acclaim through appearances at the Roskilde Festival, SPOT festival, Wundergrund Festival and Danish television. Furthermore, Carion has worked with classical artists such as the flute legend Sir James Galway and the Leipziger Streichquartett.

Carion has won prizes at several chamber music competitions, among them the Danish National Radio Chamber Music Competition in 2004. They placed first at the Marco Fiorino International Chamber Music Competition in Turin, Italy in 2006. In May of 2011 Carion won Bronze medal in Osaka International Chamber music Festa.

• About Carion's Repertoire •

Carion presents a varied and interesting repertoire. The ensemble is wellfounded in the established wind quintet works, but has received most favourable critique for their interpretation of Carl Nielsen, french composers like Jean Françaix and especially the Sechs Bagatellen by György Ligeti. Carion has worked with several composers, most notably with Morten Skovgård Danielsen, and can also present a unique range of arrangements by their own hornplayer, David M.A.P. Palmquist. Special collaborations with ensembles like Leipziger Streichquartette and artists like the soulsinger Andy Roda and the electronica guru Bjørn Svin, has created fantastic new and unexpected repertoire for Carion.

Biografi

I 2002 dannede fem unge og virtuose musikere blæserkvintetten Carion, ud fra en fælles vision om hvad kammermusik kunne blive til. Det der binder musikerne i Carion sammen, er en drøm om at udvikle og perfektionere fremførelsen af blæserkammermusik. Siden ensemblet blev dannet, har Carions medlemmer stræbt efter at ændre det traditionelle ved kammermusikken til en mere up-to-date og tiltalende oplevelse med høj kulturel værdi. De er et usædvanligt godt sammenhængende ensemble, som fremfører klassiske værker på en måde, der gør dem tilgængelige for mange forskellige slags publikum.

For at opnå dette har Carion udviklet en unik stil, hvor de spiller alt uden noder. Fraværet af nodestativer giver musikerne stor frihed til at kommunikere med hinanden og med publikum. Dette tillader også en koreografi, der følger musikken, og som afslører musikkens indre struktur. Dette tilfører en ekstra dimension til koncertoplevelsen, som gør den mere avantgardeprægede del af repertoiret lettere tilgængeligt.

Carion har et igangværende samarbejde med electronikaguruen Bjørn Svin, med hvem de har lavet flere succesfulde fremtrædender på Roskilde Festival, SPOT Festival, Wundergrund Festival og i dansk fjernsyn. Derudover har Carion arbejdet med klassiske musikere som fx den legendariske fløjtenist Sir James Galway samt Leipzig Streichquartett.

Carion har vundet priser ved flere forskellige kammermusikkonkurrencer, bl.a. ved P2's Kammermusikkonkurrence i 2004. De vandt førsteprisen ved Fiorino International Chamber Music Competition i Torino, Italien i 2006, og i maj 2011 vandt Carion en bronzemedalje ved Osaka International Chamber music Competition and Festa.

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Repertoire

Please note: This repertoire list is for reference only. The choice of repertoire for a particular project remains at the artist’s discretion.

Chamber Music

Béla Bartók

Rumänishce Volkstänze

Carl Nielsen

Wind Quintet, Op. 43

Eurico Carrapatoso

Cinco Elegias, Op. 11

György Ligeti

Sechs Bagatellen für Bläserquintett

Pablo de Sarasate

Zigeunerweisen Op. 20 for Wind Quintet

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Serenade No. 12 in C minor, 'Nacht Musique' KV 338 for wind quintet
Pieces for Wind Quintet and Orchestra

Johann Sebastian Bach

Concerto in A minor, BWV 593 after Vivaldi for flute, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon
Review
Nielsen’s Footsteps
BBC Music Magazine
Tue, 2016-03-01
Carl Nielsen’s Wind Quintet of 1921-22, written shortly after the great Fifth Symphony, is a pillar of the wind chamber music repertoire and a treasurable example of the composer’s distinctive genius. The Danish-Latvian ensemble Carion does it full justice: the players, all secure in technique and beautiful in tone, combine with immaculate attack, balance and tuning, as well as a sense of shared purpose. This may owe something to their habitual way of working: they play from memory, standing up, and moving around to bring out the changing balance of the music, and even act out the interrelationship of the parts (such as the ‘quarrel’ between clarinet and bassoon in the variation finale). This approach is demonstrated, impressively, in the bonus DVD of the Nielsen. Unfortunately it isn’t so clear in the CD recording, made in a resonant church acoustic which presents al the instruments in larger-than-life close-up. The rest of the CD consists of Danish quintets written under the influence of Nielsen’s masterpiece. Kai Senstius’s 1934 Quintet, written for the same Copenhagen group as the Nielsen, and Jens Embargo’s suite-like Quintet of 1931 are indeed almost slavishly imitative of the textures and gestures of their model, with little sign of individual creative personalities. But there’s a bit more to Svend Schultz’s lively, witty ‘little serenade’ Une Amourette of 1943. The performances of these minor pieces are enjoyable enough, but their chief effect is to rub in what a towering figure Nielsen was. Anthony Burton Performance - 5 Stars
5 stars
BBC Music Magazine
Tue, 2016-03-01
Carl Nielsen’s Wind Quintet of 1921-22, written shortly after the great Fifth Symphony, is a pillar of the wind chamber music repertoire and a treasurable example of the composer’s distinctive genius. The Danish-Latvian ensemble Carion does it full justice: the players, all secure in technique and beautiful in tone, combine with immaculate attack, balance and tuning, as well as a sense of shared purpose. This may owe something to their habitual way of working: they play from memory, standing up, and moving around to bring out the changing balance of the music, and even act out the interrelationship of the parts (such as the ‘quarrel’ between clarinet and bassoon in the variation finale). This approach is demonstrated, impressively, in the bonus DVD of the Nielsen. By: Anthony Burton, who gives the DVD 5 Stars
CD: Nielsen’s Footsteps
Gramophone
Wed, 2016-03-16
"If everyone approached an anniversary year like Carion and Odradek have here, our listening would be infinitely richer. The disc lines up Nielsen’s famous Wind Quintet against identically scored works by Danish composers who were noticeably and fascinatingly influenced by him. (...) And the Nielsen? (…) Carion’s approach is as different as can be given the writing. Blend is exceptional and the sound, from the spacious acoustic of Copenhagen’s Christians Kirke, unusually resonant. That lack of intimacy can prove a shock(…) but Carion conjure character vividly when they need to (Egīls Šēfers’s vision of Nielsen’s ‘choleric’ clarinetist Aage Oxenvad included) (...) It’s not a vision I’m used to in this work — all the more reason for them to record it and for us to hear it." By: Andrew Mellor
Carion - Highest Possible Level
Borås Tidning
Mon, 2010-11-29
The quite young ensemble Carion has chosen a perfect name. Carion originates from the Greek word Karyon which refers to growth and reproduction. Just the thing for musicians who play the classics in a completely new way, without music stands or chairs and an outgoing choreography. A wind quintet will always face the problem of limited repertoire, but it can always be solved with arrangements of existing pieces, particularly with such a capacity as horn player David Palmqvist. Mordechai Rechtman however is a hair better who in a congenial way has arranged Bach's Concerto for Organ in A minor. It was a festive and perfect sounding concert. By moving in patterns emphasising the musical structure it brought out the essence of the music. It was world class and could not possibly reach a higher level. An exhilarated audience got two brilliant encores; O Sole Mio in a priceless arrangement and the 'Vogelfänger' aria from The Magic Flute. Rolf Haglund
Nielsen Wind Quintet
Gramophone
Tue, 2016-03-01
If everyone approached an anniversary year like Carion and Odradek have here, our listening would be infinitely richer. The disc lines up Nielsen’s famous Wind Quintet against identically scored works by Danish composers who were noticeably and fascinatingly influenced by him. These are musicians almost entirely forgotten even in Denmark - provincial schoolteachers and organists, each with sound technical abilities and a receptive mind. Kai Helmer Senstius’s Quintet was written for the same ensemble as Nielsen’s and opens with the same interval. Some of that composer’s distinct landscapes are heard in music with a hint of English pastoral; there are Nielsenite interjections but without his brazen nerve. Another Funen composer, Jens Laurson Emborg, seems more at ease with the abrupt and Carion adopt a suitably emphatic attitude. Those moments contrast neatly with Emborg’s drooping ‘Fughetta malincolia’ (titled à la Nielsen) but it’s back to perky gameplay in a finale with copious lurches towards repeated chords. Copenhagen critic Svend Simon Schultz’s Une amourette has a more louche, continental feel; the writing suddenly strikes you as more horizontally conceived than vertically. And the Nielsen? Danacord’s recent release of the ‘original’ recording from four of the composer’s dedicatees underlined how approaches to this piece have changed; the Royal Danish Quintet were concerned little with blend and absolutely with Nielsen’s individual character portraits. Carion’s approach is as different as can be given the writing. Blend is exceptional and the sound, from the spacious acoustic of Copenhagen’s Christians Kirke, unusually resonant. That lack of intimacy can prove a shock - Emmanuel Pahud, Sabine Meyer and Co feel more like five individuals conversing in the dark under a low Poul Henningsen lampshade — but Carion conjure character vividly when they need to (Egīls Šēfers’s vision of Nielsen’s ‘choleric’ clarinetist Aage Oxenvad included). I can take or leave the slightly naff bonus DVD of the ensemble’s ‘choreographed’ performance, which sees them line up prayerfully for the hymn tune or square up confrontationally for irascible exchanges. If it helped induce the interpretative vision, then fine. It’s not a vision I’m used to in this work — all the more reason for them to record it and for us to hear it. Andrew Mellor
First Class Concert
Lerums Tidning
Thu, 2010-12-02
The wind quintet Carion is unique in many ways. Five musicians play a whole concert without music and can choose from a large repertoire. Without the limitation which staring at the music entails, the musicians have a freedom which makes their musicmaking close to perfect. Moving around on stage showing the structure of the music gives the audience a clearer impression of the composer's ideas. The evening was a special experience with excellent musicians who in an admirable way knew how to communicate the message from the composers to the audience. Bravi! P-G Bergfors
Dancing Winds
Hudiksvalls Tidning
Mon, 2013-02-25
The unorthodox performance style, the playfullness: Ligeti thrives when musicians makes their concerts into performances. Carion does that, throws away the formal seriousness and let their bodies have just as much fun as the music, playing without sheet music, playing standing, doing choreography. Ligetis 6 bagatelles is a diversity, it is show, beat, melody and sounds you didnt know existed. There is dramatic acting, feelings from the whole palette, sentimental, burlesque, aggressive, friendly, tonal and atonal, and chords in one amazing drive. And who said that musicians shouldnt move on the stage and along with the music? Flute, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon, very fresh and soundwise, often across the border of the cannonised and therefore much more interesting. Bach, Ibert and Nielsen, all join the dance, all perfectly portrayed with a musicality that never plays away its curios joy. Bachs a-moll concerto after Vivaldi is probably the work that causes biggest trouble with following the dance, the complicated combination of structure and passion of these baroque masters, here even transcribed to winds only, has here and there problems finding the footsteps. But that critic is irrelevant, the program has an orchestral stability and vitality that triggers the eagerness to listen, which is not a common reflection after a classical concert. () The Best Quintet in the World, according to the introduction, and why not? It is great music for only five winds with an immediately introduced theme, that is just as gentle as an everyday choral, but also has a cool and eagle like overview. The quintet has a lot to offer, what you hear is a musical form of epic, very thoroughly told. And Carions tone is so perfectly balanced - as a group but also individually strong. () By: Jan-Olov Nyström
Discography
Morten Skovgaard Danielsen: SLEEP MY DARLING JUNKIE, sleep
MSGDTC56 Released 2006
Enghoff - Chamber Pieces
ClassicO CLASSCD665 Released 2006
Press Play
cornon 488 685-2, released 2010
Schauspiel
Recommended by the German magazine Klassik
Press Service

Photo: Thomas Rønn

Representation:
DK, NO, SE, FI

Members:
  • Dóra Seres (Flute)
  • Egils Upatnieks (Oboe)
  • Egils ŠSefers (Clarinet)
  • David M.A.P. Palmquist (French Horn)
  • Niels Anders Vedsten Larsen (Bassoon)