Trio con Brio Copenhagen

Month

Biography

“Glowing reports hold true. The Trio con Brio Copenhagen clearly occupies a lofty perch in today’s musical scene.” – Washington Post.
Founded in Vienna in 1999 with the concept of pairs coming together, the two Korean sisters and Soo-Kyung and Jens (who are now married) have since then been exploring the piano trio repertoire with freshness and curiosity as well as with respect and reflection. In particular they have been gaining a reputation for the freshness of their approach to the core repertoire: “works by Beethoven, Schubert and Brahms are transformed in their hands into the alive-and-kicking music of today” —Esben Tange, editor at DR P2.
Trio con Brio Copenhagen is in great international demand and has an intensive worldwide touring schedule. Appearances this season and next include Washington DC, San Francisco, Seoul, Wigmore Hall (London), Auditorium du Louvre (Paris), Hamburg, Schwetzinger Festspiele, Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and the Trondheim Festival in Norway, among many other cities. In recent years, Trio con Brio Copenhagen has appeared in major concert halls in Europe, the USA and Asia, such as Tivoli Concert Hall, the Concertgebouw, Carnegie Hall, Wigmore Hall, the Konzerthaus Berlin, the Seoul Arts Center, Bunka Kaikan Tokyo, and Teatro Olimpico Vicenza.
Trio has won many international competitions, including the ARD (Munich), Vittorio Gui (Florence) and Norway's Trondheim Competition. In January 2015 the trio were the first ensemble to receive one of Denmark's most prestigious music awards, the “P2 Artists Prize,” at a live televised concert where they performed Beethovens' Triple Concerto with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. Other major awards received include the Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson International Trio Award (USA) and the Allianz Prize in Germany’s Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.
Trio con Brio Copenhagen plays a central role in Scandinavia's vibrant contemporary music scene. Several of Denmark's most prominent composers such as Per Nørgård and Bent Sørensen, as well as Swedish composer Sven David Sandström, have composed and dedicated works to the trio, and their CD “Phantasmagoria” of Danish contemporary music received rave reviews. The trio was greatly honored to be chosen by Per Nørgård as the dedicatee of a work that they premiered at a festival in Stockholm celebrating his 80tth birthday in 2012. In January 2016 Trio con Brio Copenhagen gives the world premiere of Bent Sørensen's Triple Concerto with the Danish National Orchestra.
The trio’s début CD was unanimously praised by critics. American Record Guide wrote: “One of the greatest performances of chamber music I’ve ever encountered . . .”. Gramophone Magazine wrote: “the performances can compete with the best available . . . airtight ensemble . . . a superb, greatly gifted chamber group.” Their just-released CD of trios by Tchaikovsky and Smetana was hailed by The Guardian (UK) as "sparkling and heartfelt . . . Trio con Brio Copenhagen scale [the Tchaikovsky's] heights with the verve their name suggests."
Trio con Brio Copenhagen is frequently featured as soloists in Beethoven’s Triple Concerto with orchestras. In 2011 the trio premiered a new Triple Concerto by the renowned Swedish composer Sven-David Sandström with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra and Kristjan Järvi in Copenhagen’s Koncerthuset. The following year, they were invited to perform the Triple Concerto with the Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra for Sandström’s 70th birthday concert in the Stockholm Konserthus.
The trio’s sound benefits from the superb instruments all three play: Soo-Jin plays a violin built by Andrea Guarneri from the 17th century, Soo-Kyung plays a Grancino cello, and Jens is Denmark’s first Steinway Artist. Both string players are endorsed by Jagar Strings and Thomastik-Infeld, Vienna.
The trio was coached by the Alban Berg Quartet, Frans Helmerson, Mihaela Martin and Harald Schoneweg at the Cologne University of Music and received excellent musical guidance by Ferenc Rados in Budapest.
The trio members are the founders and artistic directors of the Copenhagen Chamber Music Festival, which was launched with great success in 2011.

More information is available on Trio con Brio Copenhagen’s website: www.trioconbrio.dk

Soo-Jin Hong won the Grand Prix in the Seoul Young Artists Music Competition and 2nd prize in the International Violin Competition in Yekaterinburg, Russia.
She has performed as a soloist with the Moscow Symphony Orchestra (Grand Hall of the Moscow Conservatory), the Russian Philharmonic Orchestra, KBS (Korean Broadcasting System) Orchestra, and the Copenhagen Philharmonic Orchestra. In September 2008 Soo-Jin performed as soloist in the violin concerto by Tchaikovsky with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra where she received rave reviews, including one in the major Danish newspaper, “Politiken”, which headlined the review: “With Tchaikovsky’s beloved violin concerto in her hands, Soo-Jin Hong kept the audience spellbound with her fabulous technique, sound and musicality.” In 2012 Soo-Jin will perform as soloist in Bach's Double Concerto with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra in Copenhagen.
Soo-Jin was born in Seoul in 1977 and started to play violin at the age of 5. She moved to Vienna in 1991 to study with Dora Schwarzberg and after 8 years she moved to Cologne to continue her studies with the Alban Berg Quartett and Mihaela Martin.At present she lives in Copenhagen, and performs numerous solo and trio concerts in Europe, Asia and the USA.
Soo-Jin plays a violin built by Andrea Guarneri from the 17th century.

Soo-Kyung Hong has won many top prizes in international competitions, including 1st Prize in the International Johannes Brahms Competition in Austria, the Casals Prize in the International Rostropovich Cello Competition in Paris, 2nd Prize in the International Cello Competition in Liezen, Austria, and 2nd Prize in the Prix Mercure Competition in Vienna. Soo-Kyung has appeared in the Pablo Casals Festival in Prades, the Festival d’Ile de France in Paris, the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival in Germany, the Schubert- and Mozart-Saal in Konzerthaus Vienna, and the Seoul Arts Center and KBS Concert Hall in Korea. She has performed as soloist with the Munich Chamber Orchestra, the Vienna Jeunesse Orchestra, the Royal Danish Orchestra, Russian Philharmonic Orchestra, Copenhagen Philharmonic Orchestra, Korean Broadcasting Symphony Orchestra, and the Janacek Chamber Orchestra. In November 2008, she was the soloist in Elgar’s Cello Concerto with the Aalborg Symphony Orchestra in Denmark.
Soo-Kyung was born in Seoul in 1977 and studied with Angelica May in the Vienna Musikhochschule, and with Frans Helmerson and the Alban Berg Quartett in the Cologne Musikhochschule. She has participated in master classes with Mstislav Rostropovich, Janos Starker, Ralph Kirschbaum, and Steven Isserlis, among others.
Soo-Kyung plays a Giovanni Grancino cello from 1672.

Jens Elvekjaer has established himself as one of the leading Scandinavian pianists. Denmark’s first and only Steinway Artist, he has performed as soloist with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra, the Leipzig Chamber Orchestra, the Aarhus Symphony Orchestra, and the Aalborg Symphony Orchestra. In 2012 he will be soloist with the Copenhagen Philharmonic, the Danish National Symphony and the Tivoli Symphony Orchestra.
Jens made his U.S. recital début on Washington D.C.’s distinguished Dumbarton Oaks series in 2009, and returned to D.C. to play a solo recital at the National Gallery later that year. His numerous solo appearances in Europe and Asia include the Vienna Festwochen, Amsterdam’s Beurs van Berlage, the Giresta Piano Festival in Uppsala, Sweden; the Royal Library in Copenhagen, the Usedom Music Festival in Germany, the Roskilde Schubertiade the Scandinavian Piano Festival of Danish Radio, and Tokyo’s Musashino Hall. He has been invited to such prestigious festivals such as the Pablo Casals Festival in Prades, France; the Bergen Festival, Norway; the Umeå Festival, Sweden; and the Kuhmo and Korsholm Chamber Music Festivals in Finland.
Jens was born in Copenhagen and studied with K. H. Kämmerling in Salzburg, Leonid Brumberg in Vienna, Ferenc Radosc in Budapest, and the Alban Berg Quartett in Cologne. His début solo CD of works by Ravel, Debussy, and Franck was nominated for two Danish Music Awards. His latest release is a CD of Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3 and Triple Concerto (with Trio con Brio Copenhagen).

Dansk biografi:
”Glødende rapporter taler sandt. Trio con Brio Copenhagen har en høj profil på nutidens musikscene" - Washington Post

Dannet i 1999 efter konceptet at par mødes, har de to koreanske søstre sammen med pianisten Jens Elvekjær (som siden er blevet gift med Soo-Kyung) udforsket klavertriorepertoiret med såvel friskhed og nysgerrighed som respekt og eftertanke. De er især blevet rost for deres tilgang til kernerepertoiret: "Værker af Beethoven, Schubert og Brahms bliver i deres hænder omdannet til levende musik i vor tid" - Esben Tange, DR P2
Trio con Brio er meget efterspurgt internationalt og har en tæt, verdensomspændende turnékalender. Koncerter i denne og kommende sæson omfatter Washington DC, San Francisco, Seoul, Wigmore Hall, London, Auditiorium du Louvre, Paris, Hamburg, Schwetzinger Festspiele, Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Trondheim Kammermusikfestival, Norge, samt utallige danske festivaler. I de senere år har Trio con Brio Copenhagen givet koncerter i store prestigefulde koncertsale verden over som Concertgebouw, Carnegie Hall, Wigmore Hall, Kozerthaus Berlin, Seoul Arts Center, Bunka Kaikan Tokyo, Teatro Olimpico Vicenza og Tivolis Koncertsal.

Trioen har vundet mange internationale konkurrencer, bl.a. ARD, München, Vittorio Gui, Firenze og Kammermusikkonkurrencen i Trondheim. I 2015 modtog trioen P2’s Kunstnerpris, som det første ensemble nogensinde, ved en koncert i Koncerthuset, hvor de spillede Beethovens Tripelkoncert med DR Symfoniorkestret. Andre store priser omfatter Kalichstein-Laredeo-Robinson International Trio Award og Allianz Prize ved festspillene i Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.

Trio con Brio Copenhagen spiller en central rolle på Skandinaviens nutidige musikscene. Adskillige af Danmarks mest fremtrædende komponister som Per Nørgård og Bent Sørensen, samt den svenske komponist Sven David Sandström, har komponeret og dedikeret værker til trioen, og deres CD "Phantasmagoria" med danske nutidige værker, er blevet modtaget med blændende anmeldelser. Trioen blev meget beæret over at Per Nørgård i 2012 dedikerede et værk til dem i anledning af komponistens 80-års fødselsdag. Værket blev uropført ved en festival i Stockholm Konserthus. I januar 2016 uropfører trioen Bent Sørensens Trippelkoncert med DR Symfoniorkestret.

Trioens debut-cd modtog lutter rosende ord af anmelderne. American Record Guide skrev: "En af de største fremførelser af kammermusik som jeg har oplevet". Gramophone: "Opførelserne kan konkurrere med de absolut bedste...et lufttæt ensemble...et super, meget talentfuldt ensemble". Den nyligt udgivne cd med trioer af Tchaikovsky og Smetana blev rost af The Guardian som "glitrende og inderlig...Trio con Brio Copenhagen når Tchaikovskys højder, med det liv som navnet på trioen tilsiger".

Trio con Brio Copenhagen optræder jævnligt som solister i Beethovens Trippelkoncert, og i indeværende sæson opfører de værket med Malmö Symfoniorkester.
Trioens exceptionelle klang nyder godt af de fine instrumenter, de spiller på: Soo-Jin spiller på en Guarneri violin, Soo-Kyung på en Grancino cello og Jens Elvekjær er Danmarks første Steinway Artist. Begge strygere bliver støttet af Jargar Strings og Thomastik-Infeld, Wien.
Trioen har modtaget coaching og undervisning af Alban Berg Quartet, Frans Helmerson, Mihaela Martin og Harald Schoneweg ved Köln Universitet og har modtaget fremragende musikalsk inspiration fra Ferenc Rados i Budapest.

Trioens medlemmer er kunstneriske ledere af den succesfulde Copenhagen Chamber Music Festival, som løb af stablen første gang i 2011.

Calendar

Friday, December 1, 2017

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Repertoire

Please note: this repertoire list is for reference only. The choice of repertoire for a particular project remains at the artist’s discretion.

Review
Passion and Panache in Danish performances of Romantic Piano Trios
The Strad
Mon, 2016-02-01
Deluged with plaudits for its earlier recordings, this ensemble comes with a reputation to live up to — and doesn't disappoint. From the first note, the Trio con Brio exudes class. But what signals such a high level of playing from the outset? Initially, in this very warm recording, one notices the blending The textures are miraculously clear and the often thick piano writing in Tchaikovsky's Trio is adeptly handled to allow the strings to shine through. The violinist and cellist are sisters, and seem to have that unquantifiable sense of empathy that makes for absolutely unified bowing and gesture. Then there is a fine sense of structure, and nuance within phrases. Colour and contrast are always important in the second-movement variations of the Tchaikovsky —particular highlights being the fifth variation, which boasts golden-hued lilting melodic conversation, and the fugue in the eighth, where the ensemble brings great clarity to the intricate contrapuntal dialogues. Smetana's Trio is full of high-voltage drama and gesture, which admirably suit the vernacular of this ensemble. Immediately we are off to a passionate start. But there are also wonderful moments of repose, for example where the cellist delivers a gloriously reflective melody. Likewise, the finale is both explosive and exquisitely intimate — aspects that this performance delivers with compelling panache. JOANNE TALBOT SMETANA Piano Trio in G minor op.15 TCHAIKOVSKY Piano Trio in A minor op.50 Trio con Brio Copenhagen ORCHID ORC 100051
New Danish Masterpiece
Berlingske
Fri, 2016-01-22
THE TRIPLE CONCERTO IS BENT SØRENSEN'S BEST TO DATE, A MIRACLE OF DREAMING ATMOSHPERES CREATING IMAGES Bent Sørensen has never had a phase like this. He peels the music down to only bare necessity and gives it a tinge of melancholy and nightly atmosphere. His latest work is named "L'isola della Citta" and was world premiered in DR Concert Hall Thursday evening. It is a piece for large orchestra and three soloists playing violin, cello and piano. And it is a masterpiece. ..."The hall has seldom been so silent as for this premiere. Thanks to the pianist Jens Elvekjær and the sisters Soo-Jin Hong, violin and Soo-Kyung Hong, cello for their full hearted performance. Thanks to the Danish National Symphony Orchestra for their thorough preparation and flawless meeting with Sørensen's demanding score. Søren Schauser
Danish Star Trio Premiered Danish Triple Concerto
Politiken
Fri, 2016-01-22
THERE ARE ORDINARY THURSDAY EVENING CONCERTS. AND THEN THERE ARE CONCERTS LIKE YESTERDAY ..."Then there are the special concerts and this week we experienced one of them. With a conductor the audience loves and a programme which offered not only some of the 19th century's great classics and which were beautifully bound together. And which even included a wonderful premiere." "Has Danish composer Bent Sørensen listened to the dismal sounds from the music in "Taxi DRiver"? Or is it because the composer has just moved from the countryside into the city of Copenhagen, that the orchestra delivered a dystopian city background, while his romantic ghostly music materialised between the three soloists? That one cannot know. But the echos and descending glissandi, which are characteristic of Sørensen, lives in his new triple concerto liek an island of beauty in the middle of a giddy, grating world, which the music of beauty and stillness dreamingly seems detached from. The orchestra musicians let clubs sound against wooden blocks, whilst Trio con Brio played their important part of the concerto with brilliant energy. They have toured with Sørensen's trio Phatasmagoria, which they premiered in 2007, and they played the last movement as an encore. Because the hall just kept on applauding. Parts of the fuga in 'L'isola della cittá' reminded one, that it is Beethoven who has introduced the challenging combination of violin, cello, piano and orchestra with his triple concerto. But Bent Sørensen makes the combination work better. In fact flawless. At least in this performance. It made new contemporary music an experience for everybody who has a longing for beauty within. A longing which opens for contact with spirits of the past. A very, very fine evening. Thomas Michelsen
An Island of Beautiful Trio-tones
Jyllandsposten
Sat, 2016-01-23
BENT SØRENSEN'S TITILLATING TONE POETRY SEEPED THROUGH HIS NEW TRIPLE CONCERTO "L'ISOLA DELLA CITTÁ", WHICH TRIO CON BRIO NAVIGATED GENTLY THROUGH TOGETHER WITH DANISH NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA An island in the city leads thoughts towards an exotic oasis, where one can seek peace and quiet away from the roaring city. In Bent sørensen's newly written triple concerto which Trio con Brio performed thursday evening, the trio was an exposed island. The orchestra played the devouring city. The soloists on piano, violin and cello fought with sweet passages for the existence of the island in five poetic movements, whilst the orchestra in between was close to drowning the oasis with expansive outbreaks of sound. Sørensen's very special tone poetry saturated both the trio's insect like buzzing, the percussion's abrupt interruptions and the brass players melancholic calling. The musicians in Trio con Brio tour the world thin; their playing is extremely close and let magically the instrumanets melt together in homogenous sound colours. As a crisp surprise the piano broke the meditative expanse with a catching motife. To see a large number of the orchestra musicians grab wooden blocks and bang on them with wooden sticks gave a raw titallising effect. Christine Christiansen
Tchaikovsky, Smetena: Piano Trios CD review – sparkling and heartfelt
The Guardian
Sun, 2015-11-29
Grief and anguish unite these lyrically expressive trios. Tchaikovsky subtitled his “In memory of a great artist”, his friend and mentor Nikolai Rubinstein, while poor Smetana wrote his after the death from scarlet fever of his four-year-old daughter Bedřiška. But that’s where their similarity ends. Tchaikovsky’s trio is monumental, unique in the repertoire; Trio con Brio Copenhagen scale its heights with the verve their name suggests, pianist Jens Elvekjaer sparkling in the brilliant set of 11 variations central to the piece. In contrast, the Smetana is brief but deeply heartfelt, the beauty of its bleak majesty perfectly captured by the Danish players. Recommended. Stephen Pritchard
What a Concert Should Be
Kristelig Dagblad
Wed, 2015-04-15
Six Stars! Masterful Trio con Brio enthralls with lavish program. To say that the three musicians of Trio con Brio Copenhagen are talented would be a gross understatement. They are masterful, and their concert Monday evening in Mogens Dahl Concert Hall enthralled in a way that only true art can do—literally: One was carried away to another place, and the music sang on in one's mind in the hours after the concert, and still does. The program was lavish. First, Beethoven's fifth piano trio, opus 70 no. 1 in D major, the so-called "Ghost Trio." The title refers to the second movement's particularly expressive character. The two fast outer movements, Allegro vivace e con brio and Presto, paint a quite different picture. Here we encounter Beethoven in the midst of his heroic period. The two string players, sisters Soo-Jin Hong (violin) and Soo-Kyung Hong (cello) joined pianist Jens Elvekjær in this work with all the intensity and vigor one could wish for. The Swedish composer Sven-David Sandström offered nothing less than a world premiere with his Four Pieces for Piano Trio. Lasting about fifteen minutes, the four pieces are a wonderful mix of tight Nordic minimalism in the style of his settings of Tomas Tranströmer's poems ("Nordic Mass," recently reviewed in this paper) and crystalline layerings of sound colors and rhythm. It was evident that Trio con Brio has a special feeling for this music. After intermission came Tchaikovsky's only piano trio, Opus 50 in A minor from 1882, a nearly 50-minute long work, originally dedicated to the composer's good friend and founder of the Moscow Conservatory, Nikolai Rubinstein, who died in 1881. They did not spare themselves; Trio con Brio played this fascinating work with almost preternatural fire and involvement. They were visibly exhausted after their performance. One wonders with gratitude: what it is that makes these three musicians so unique as an ensemble? If you go one level deeper than just tossing out the words "world class," the answer, perhaps, lies in their particular mix of temperament—of which they show more than even the legendary trios on my CD-rack do—and transparency. Things can grow quite impetuous when they get going, but this rarely, if ever, overshadows the transparency of their playing. The big picture is never lost. And this is where their artistry lies, more so than merely in their fabulous technique. Alive and kicking Beethoven, Sandström and Tchaikovsky—what a trio, what trios!
Tue, 2014-02-18
Trio con Brio Copenhagen in Wigmore Hall
MusicOMH.com - Classical reviews
Sun, 2008-05-04
Trio con Brio Copenhagen, formed by the Korean sisters Soo-Jin Hong and Soo-Kyung Hong and the Danish pianist Jens Elvekjaer, is clearly a well greased machine, arching and swaying in perfect harmony with each other and the music. Their Wigmore Hall recital was a night of dramatic and unearthly compositions spanning the years 1808 to 2007. With music and performers at this level, chamber music doesn't get much more absorbing. It's not often said of such a giant, but Beethoven's contribution was more than slightly put in the shade by the sheer daring and spark of the other three works. The programme started with the old master's Ghost Trio, which sets off in the wrong gear and, from the racing, jagged first few bars, the performers have to make a swift adjustment in order to find themselves on the right road, rocky as that is. The music swelled and receded in typically turbulent bursts, more tranquil sections drawing honest and emotive cello playing from Soo-Kyung Hong, with no frills or ostentation. As with any single movement of Beethoven there is never only one frame of mind contained in the music and there were little storms brewing which continued into the chirruping 3rd movement. What happened next robbed my memory of any more details than that. Shostakovich's Piano Trio no. 2 begins with an unbearably plaintive call from the cello, performed intensely and instantly creating a chilling atmosphere. The soaring 'harmonic' notes (i.e. the fingers only lightly touching the strings at certain points, producing a higher pitch than should seem possible) from the cello are taken up by the violin (this time without harmonics, making the violin sound oddly lower than the cello) and then on to the piano in a disconcerting mini-fugue. This kind of music could have continued in the same vein all night as far as I was concerned, but it eventually veered onto a chugging path that steadily grew until the volume suddenly plummeted as the music continued in a stunning near-silence. There is a good deal of head-nodding in the audience as Shostakovich introduces some snazzy, aggressive folk music with an occasional nagging premonition of his own eighth string quartet (written 16 years later). This was the real ghost of the evening. There were as many dynamic swoops here as in the Beethoven piece, Trio con Brio playing again with deadly focus and agility. The final movement started with booming, chunky chords on the piano, gradually being replaced by a sinister pizzicato section sounding like a tiptoeing villain. The whole thing concluded with the violin finally getting a chance to haunt us with its own searing harmonics. After the interval there was a new piece. It was sensational. Written by Bent Sorensen in 2007 and dedicated to Trio con Brio, Phantasmagoria started with what sounded like urgent and exotic bird-calls from the violin and cello bursting out in all directions. Using sliding glissando effects, tiny near-melodies appeared only to subtly vanish into thin air. Every sort of unusual technique is used by the strings, but it manages to avoid sounding like "a hundred and one ways to use a violin" manual, maybe because the aim is to explore individual sounds as sounds rather than to tease the audience with quirky novelties. There aren't really any musical lines going on little journeys here, more like music reflecting on itself in both senses of the phrase. It seemed likely, but thankfully Sorensen wasn't tempted to have the pianist reach inside the piano to create those all too familiar "ethereal" effects; there was too much good taste in evidence for that. This was a sensitively constructed collection of gorgeous little morsels. The work ended with a beautiful (though it probably only lasted four seconds) bit of singing by one of the two string players over the closing meanderings of the piano. Again, a wonderfully judged bit of delicacy. Ravel's Trio for Piano, Violin and Cello, the final piece, was ravishing from the very first chord. This is sublime music that lifts you like sunlight. Though the instruments share the same musical material, the same tunes, each player projects the music as if it were completely individual to themselves. Jens Elvekjaer's piano tone (here as elsewhere) was glimmering in the tender passages and powerful in the many dramatic twists of Ravel's mind. Unlike Shostakovich, Ravel is not hell-bent on convincing us he has an individual musical language; he doesn't need to because the ideas are pouring out of him so naturally and joyfully. There was no real interpretive slant on this or any other work in the programme. Trio con Brio are not visionaries, but they recognise that with music so abundantly rich you don't need to reinvent it to have it radiate with freshness. Nice little Mendelssohn encore, too. By Stephen Crowe
The Magical Trio and the Clarinet
Nordjyske
Sun, 2008-08-10
Trio con Brio can celebrate its 10th Anniversary next year. Already the first time we heard them in our area their playing was a revelation, and the ensemble has made their breakthrough internationally after being awarded the prestigious Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Award in 2005. Their playing is no less than perfect, and if they should be caught on a bad day, certainly they will be the only to notice. Where other ensembles find they have reached a satisfactory levelin their musicianship, Trio con Brio only begin their serious work. Their trade mark is perfection in sound. This was demonstrated in Ravel, where the movements changed between delicate coloured sound and violent expressive discharges, but the music never lost its transparancy, mainly due to Elvekjær's sublime touch, light and precise at the same time. Messiaëns Quartet for the End of Time was composed while the composer was in concentration camp and is considered one of the main chamber music pieces in the 20th. century. The performance was hypnotizing from beginning to end with Elvekjær's crisp and transparant colours, Soo-Jun Hong's strongly focused and passionate clarinet, and cellist Soo-Kyung's indescribably beautiful melody floating above Elvekjær's dark, mellow chords. The piece was performed with such concentration that it was transmitted to the very last pew in Sindal Church.
Lucid Elegance
Gramophone
Tue, 2008-07-01
"Sisters violinist Soo-Jin Hong and cellist Soo-Kyung Hong, and pianist Jens Elvekjaer perform with uncommon fluidity and polish, phrasing with unanimity and playing with sensitivity. The group´s lucid elegance is well suited to Ravel´s Piano Trio. The opening Modere is especially well done, capturing the brooding ruminative expression, with wonderfully languorous violin playing by Soo-Jin Hong. The clarity and spotless articulation of the sisters´ string playing is striking even under pressure in the explosive concluding section. The trio´s airtight ensemble and natural pacing show a firm grasp of Ravel´s structure and style, with the ensuing Pantoum tossed off with the right lightly tripping vivacity. . . their spacious eloquent playing is faultless, with hushed, evocative keyboard work by Elvekjaer at the coda. The performance is rounded off with a sparkling and energized Anime, blending polish and fizzing energy in fine order . . . the Ravel and Bloch performances can compete with the best available. The Trio con Brio Copenhagen is clearly a superb, greatly gifted chamber group, and I look forward to future encounters.”
With the Doctor's participation
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Wed, 2009-04-29
Trio con Brio Copenhagen in the 'Alte Oper', Frankfurt There was the evidence. A facsimile insert leaf included in the program at the chamber music evening concert, of the Frankfurt Museum Society: on "December 29th, 1882, 7 o'clock in the evening". And the insert states this was in fact "with the participation of Dr. Johannes Brahms". On this occasion, his C major piano trio, op. 87 was performed "for the first time". Upon the conclusion of this season of a series so rich in tradition, the finale recital of this jubilee concert season - "200 Years of the Museum Society" - was this eminent work. It was now to be heard with the superb and youthful "Trio con Brio Copenhagen" in the Mozart Hall of the Alte Oper providing a very supple interpretation. During the performance the Korean sisters Soo-Jin and Soo-Kyung Hong (violin and cello) strengths were especially evident in the more muted tones, such as in the opening movement or in the trio section of the scherzo, whose structure was shaped with apt dryness and precision. The Dane, Jens Elvekjaer, a superlative chamber music pianist, was well aligned with this altogether gentle approach with optimal balance. And he did not fail to convey the more pungent, characteristic Brahms sound. There was a high point right at the start, not least thanks to his eminently light and fleet playing in Haydn's C major piano trio (Hob. XV:27): crystal clear, perfectly coordinated ensemble playing, extremely well differentiated. The slow middle movement was particularly thought stimulating in its profundity. The presto finale with its playful jocularity and directly pleasing thematic material, likely was the tune most people were likely to go home whistling, being so appealing and memorable. The ensemble was entirely within the idiom of the composer. They had received a substantial boost to their career with their success at the Munich ARD Competition in 2002, playing Ravel's a minor piano trio. This ideally harmonizing Danish-Korean alliance unfurled a maximum of color interplay, finest nuance, delicate pastel shades, but also expressively forceful colors, in the finale practically kaleidoscope-like, bubbling up effervescently. In addition, the whole was convincingly presented as a single, connected narrative. There was the gently rocking, ever circuitous motion of the second movement, which with its title "Pantoum" seems more to allude to a mysterious and exotic element rather than a specific reference to a Malayan form of poetry; the bleak, reductive Passacaille, which in introverted mood offers an unusual switching back and forth between feelings of solitude and togetherness. The encore, following the Brahms, the final work, was the slow movement of Mozart's B-flat major piano trio (KV 502). GUIDO HOLZE
Important Recording
Politiken
Tue, 2009-05-12
Trio con Brio's new release is on the small label CDklassisk, but it must belong to one of the most important releases in the 200-year anniversary of Mendelssohn's birth. The tempo is high everywhere, but it does not compromise the details in the beautiful flowing music. Mendelssohn's music sounds as though it plays itself in simple phrases, which follow each other as development or comment, and it is the convincing simplicity which gives the recording its great force and importance. Five Hearts Henrik Friis
Unique Performance
Nordkurier
Mon, 2009-07-20
..."For everyone, who were hoping for something familiar, there was Beethoven's Triple Concerto played by Trio con Brio Copenhagen. With so many dynamic contrasts, withouth struggles between the solo instrument for domincance, so elegant and gracious played by this trio is seldom heard. In addition the sisters Soo-Jin Hong and Soo-Kyung Hong with pianist Jens Elvekjaer were so unbelievably precise, that this pure ensembleplay in this piece illuminated rarely heard depths and moments of rare moments of high tension developed. This unique performance received storming applause and standing ovations.
Unforgettable
Berlingske Tidende
Fri, 2009-07-10
….. The Trio con Brio Copenhagen emerged a few years ago already the perfect players. But the three stars kept on working, bringing the three corners ever closer together, polishing their valuable crystal into something even greater: pure art. Their reading of Mendelssohn’s piano trios is certainly fantastic. Don’t be fooled by the fact that it was released by the best-kept secret Copenhagen record company of them all, because the soul of the romantic period warms more than just the cockles of our hearts. Moreover, Jens Elvekjær from Denmark on the piano, his Korean wife on the cello and her sister on the violin are superbly capable. They play differently from their colleagues from recording history: slightly less breezily than the former Beaux Arts Trio. Slightly more together than Istomin, Rose and Stern. Do listen to their new CD or catch one of the many concerts they’re giving these days. Such as tomorrow’s concert at the Tivoli Concert Hall ... You’ll relish Soo-Jin’s slender violin playing, nod approvingly at Soo-Kyung’s cello as it generates ever increasing profundity, and admire Jens’s all-embracing piano ... Open your eyes and take in this unforgettable dissonance of black, green and turquoise. Open your ears and take in this perfect unity. Søren Schauser
Accomplished and Sensitive
New York Times
Wed, 2009-08-05
Trio con Brio Copenhagen, an award-winning ensemble consisting of the Danish pianist Jens Elvekjaer and two Korean sisters, the violinist Soo-Jin Hong and the cellist Soo-Kyung Hong. These accomplished and sensitive musicians gave a beautifully subdued performance of Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio No. 1 in D minor. Mr. Elvekjaer brought exceptional grace and fluidity to the rippling runs in the piano. Mostly Mozart Festival, Avery Fischer Hall at Lincoln Center By ANTHONY TOMMASINI
Trio Shines in Heiligendamm
OSTSEE-ZEITUNG
Fri, 2009-09-18
A magnificent evening it was indeed…….try and find anyone able to play a Haydn work (G major, "Gypsy Trio") in such a way as if it were completely new: with meticulous sensitivity for the many fine details and wonderful ideas, all too often flamboyantly overrun, for the incisive figurative articulation, lightness, elasticity and expressive variety. …. All musical sequences profit from an essential though unobtrusively differentiated manner of making music – practically bringing the tones to "speak". This approach rendered Mendelssohn's 2nd Piano Trio (c minor) a powerful experience of elfin lightness, was emphatic and passionate, full of melodic sweetness and ebullient vitality. All of this and more is already compositionally incorporated in Dvorak's renowned "Dumky" Trio: six movements based on the Ukrainian Dumka, lucid and to some extent brusquely contrasting. This work represents a particularly prickly proving grounds. By EKKEHARD OCHS
Extraordinary Chambermusic
Politiken
Thu, 2009-07-09
…….. The highlight of the first concert at the Tivoli Concert Hall was the great power of the Trio con Brio in Mendelssohn’s C minor trio. The three players demonstrated two of the decisive qualities that make their chamber music making so extraordinary. Each of them has so much to give each tiny little romantic episode in Mendelssohn’s music, and hence each of them continually varied the music in terms of volume, tempi, colouring and temperament, turning it into a kaleidoscopic interpretive mosaic. This musical variety was also carried out with enormous collective determination. If there had been any differences in the rehearsal room as to the way they thought Mendelssohn should be played in the bicentenary of his birth, there was no disagreement in what the audience were allowed to hear or see. It was as if they had adopted old-fashioned democratic centralism as their musical constitution. They showed a united front to the audience. Thus their superb coordination in the devilish third movement was utterly convincing even when the score might seem to lose momentum a bit, and they made the long, slender, lines of the fourth movement elevate like a passionate hymn. All this at invariably effective tempi and with the same convincing precision the trio impressed everyone with on their Mendelssohn CD this spring……… By Henrik Friis
Trio con Brio at Mogens Dahl Koncertsal
Jyllands-Posten: Jakob Levinsen
Fri, 2008-02-22
Trio con Brio will have their debut at Carnegie Hall in New York next month. Sunday they presented the tour program in Copenhagen and thereby cemented the trio’s candidacy for one of this year best Danish chamber music ensembles. It seemed that there was not the smallest detail in the four trios by Haydn, Bent Sørensen, Maurice Ravel and Brahms that had not been minutely rehearsed and put into place in the balance between the instrument as well as in the overall musical structure in the concert program which was presented Sunday night in Mogens Dahl Concert Hall, Copenhagen. The family business of husband, wife and sister-in-law who have been playing together for ten years – all of them individually excellent musicians – play together with a robust basis and eager-to-tell combined with a very high level of thorough preparation. The result is a music that resonates both grand and transparent. The music is powerful and captivating and at the same time full of refinement and points you never noticed before in otherwise well known movements.
Passionate Presence
Berlingske Tidende
Wed, 2011-11-16
The striking Trio con Brio takes place in front of the orchestra. Jens Elvekjær at the piano, his Korean wife with the cello and her sister with the violin. They play six movements by Swedish Sven-David Sandström, who is present and listening intently into the darkness. He is a controversial composer. The opening sends the audience's ears in the modern direction, the continuation is incredibly beautiful, the following movement challenges again and so on - which the defender of true avantgarde of course sees as treachery. When the orchestra plays Sandström falls back on all the challenges of last generation and when the adept trio plays the music is next to ordinary. But he succeeds. Because Sandström is present in both kinds of music, and because one gets so many of those effects music lovers most of all wishes to hear.
Thundering Applause
Politiken
Sat, 2011-09-17
Even the premiere of the Swedish nestor Sven-David Sandström's six pieces for piano trio and orchestra created thundering applause. New compositions normally do not awake spontaneous enthusiasm, but the combination of Trio con Brio's highly energetic and yet precise interpretation, friendly romantic melodies and emotional tableaus is helpful for Järvi to make contemporary music easy to grasp. The first three pieces changed between quiet solo string voices of quite ordinary highly romantic passion, pumping percussion and aggressive passages. The fourth piece was charactarised by soft bowings and reminded of perfumed background music to a film with a sentimental story. Fifth piece was short and intense, while the ending postlude was the most beautiful and clearest part expressed in glass clear timbre... Three solo parts were played with impressive intensity and reckless consistency. Not many can deliver a complex premiere with the same attitude as in a thoroughly rehearsed mainstream repertoire piece. This trio seems to be able to create a great experience out of everything.
Contrasts
Jyllandsposten
Thu, 2011-11-17
...The contrasts came with the premiere of 69 year old Sven-David Sandström's Six Pieces for Piano Trio and Orchestra. Sandström is known for his spectacular works and these six pieces are no exception. In the beginning the percussion stole the sound picture, but pianist, violinist and cellist followed and created a lyric contrast. The piano reminded of soft raindrops. later the piece moved through pastel coloured impressionism and ingratiating romanticism. There were shrill. crisp violin sounds, massive percussion and awkward brass chords. The three soloists followed each other closely and stepped forward alternately with fine solo passages. On the podium Kristjan Järvi coloured and shaped the simple accompaniment. Very evocative. The piece is a co-commission from the Danish National Symphony Orchestra, South Jutland and Odense Symphony Orchestras.
Masterful Mendelssohn
Classic FM Magazine
Tue, 2011-11-01
Piano Trios Nos 1 & 2 Trio Con Brio Copenhagen The Music: Mendelssohn's penchant for rippling piano figurations and espressivo string writing goes into overdrive in two of his greatest chamber masterpieces. The Performances: Not since the famous coupling by Isaac Stern and friends for CBS (now Sony, SMK 64519) have Mendelssohn's two piano trios been performed with such emotional intensity on disc. If anything the Trio Con Brio goes one better with playing that caresses the lower end of the dynamic spectrum as much as it exalts in the music's climaxes. Every phrase soars and pulsates with the excitement of a fresh discovery as the Copenhagen players go the full distance with playing of skin-rippling sensitivity, enhanced by engineering of velvet glove radiance. The Verdict: Sensational playing from Korean sisters Soo-Jin Hong and Soo-Kyung Hong and Danish piano wizard Jens Elvekjaer makes this my chamber disc of 2011. Try their outstanding debut recording of trios by Ravel, Dvorák and Bloch (Azica, ACD-71240). JULIAN HAYLOCK
Lasting Impression
Mittelbayerische Zeitung
Mon, 2012-03-12
It seems to be the still young Trio con Brio's ambition to do each and every composer justice and to find and express the particular sound universe of each. They can already look back on several prizes and major world tours . . . . The musicians react to each other like lightning . . . pure joy that you carried home with youunforgettable.
Ideal Alliance
Berlingske
Fri, 2009-07-10
.. The Trio con Brio Copenhagen emerged a few years ago already the perfect players. But the three stars kept on working, bringing the three corners ever closer together, polishing their valuable crystal into something even greater: pure art. Their reading of Mendelssohns piano trios is certainly fantastic. Dont be fooled by the fact that it was released by the best-kept secret Copenhagen record company of them all, because the soul of the romantic period warms more than just the cockles of our hearts. Moreover, Jens Elvekjær from Denmark on the piano, his Korean wife on the cello and her sister on the violin are superbly capable. They play differently from their colleagues from recording history: slightly less breezily than the former Beaux Arts Trio. Slightly more together than Istomin, Rose and Stern. Do listen to their new CD or catch one of the many concerts theyre giving these days. Such as tomorrows concert at the Tivoli Concert Hall ... Youll relish Soo-Jins slender violin playing, nod approvingly at Soo-Kyungs cello as it generates ever increasing profundity, and admire Jenss all-embracing piano ... Open your eyes and take in this unforgettable dissonance of black, green and turquoise. Open your ears and take in this perfect unity. Søren Schauser
The Reserves Were World Class
Kristeligt Dagblad
Fri, 2012-05-18
It was bad and good news at Mogens Dahl Concert Hall. The Danish String Quartet had to cancel due to illness but fortunately Trio con Brio Copenhagen could replace them with a lovely programme of three excellent piano trios. Haydn's Gypsy Trio was followed by Mendelssohn: Piano Trio no. 2, which the trio has recorded and which must be one of the best Danish chamber music recordings ever (CDKlassiks 1014). To hear it live was not an unexpected but enthralling experience. One could once again establish that Trio con Brio has a wonderful grip on Mendelssohn. After the interval we heard Tchaikovsky's Trio in A minor, composed to commemorize a great artist - his friend Nikolaj Rubinstein. Trio con Brio is pure world class  and the ensemble carries its name in its own right. Con brio means lively and this word characterizes these three musicians. The two Korean sisters Soo-Jin Hong and Soo-Kyung Hong and pianist Jens Elvekjær have played together since 1999. The two string players have an energetic and reckless style which surprises, and Jens Elvekjær is a unique pianist. His impressive technique goes hand in hand with a deep musical fingerspitzgefühl and his alertness brings the trio's playing to a higher level. What a privilege for a concert organiser to present such reserves. The trio will return in the autumn. I recommend you mark the date in your calendar. Peter Dürrfeld
Dazzlingly, Flexibly Fantastic
Sydsvenskan
Sun, 2012-02-26
. . . an amazingly generous concert that deserved an even larger audience than the packed hall could hold.
Concert in Frankfurt Alte Oper
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Wed, 2009-04-29
This ideally harmonizing Danish-Korean alliance unfurled a maximum of color interplay, finest nuance, delicate pastel shades, but also expressively forceful colors, in the finale practically kaleidoscope-like, bubbling up effervescently. In addition, the whole was convincingly presented as a single, connected narrative. There was the gently rocking, ever circuitous motion of the second movement, which with its title "Pantoum" seems more to allude to a mysterious and exotic element rather than a specific reference to a Malayan form of poetry; the bleak, reductive Passacaille, which in introverted mood offers an unusual switching back and forth between feelings of solitude and togetherness. Guido Holze
Journey of Exploration With Surprises
The Boston Musical Intelligencer
Mon, 2012-07-02
The program opened with Spell by Per Nørgård (b. 1932), the dean of Danish composers with seven symphonies, three concerti, operas, and numerous smaller works  more than 400 to date. Spell was composed in 1973 and is based on a solo keyboard piece named Turn, with a weaving in of clarinet and cello; they played the arrangement for violin trio. The piece is based on Nørgårds infinity series, an algorithmic method of generating melodies from various mathematical rules so the result is endless and self-referential. Elvekjaer explained in a brief introductory comment that the structure of the piece was inspired by Quantum Mechanics, with a slow, steady drip from the piano interacting with and gaining energy from the other instruments, exciting it into higher quantum states. The piece, he said, ends with chaos leading to a big bang, followed by expansion and dispersal. Be that as it may, one does not need the mathematics or the quantum imagery to enjoy the music: the piece was both lyrical and haunting, progressing by bringing together the threads being spun by the three instruments into more complex, unified and dramatic playing. The Trio played with marvelous balance and interweaving of voice at all dynamic levels, playing with total unity while maintaining their individual characters throughout. Spell ended with the voices evaporating into nothingness and a long frozen silence. Quantum uncertainty carried into the performance of the Brahms Piano Trio in C minor, op. 101. It was almost a post-modern reading without a meta-narrative  Kierkegaardian, one might say, leaving more questions than answers. It was disconcerting at the time, but left one feeling that dark layers of varnish had been removed to reveal a totally different Brahms. As with the late Beethoven, this late Brahms chamber work seems to distill things down to their essence. The first movement Allegro in this reading opened with a violent, dramatic four-note upward sweep, full of energy, followed by a soft and sweet second theme and an episodic reading of the development. The Presto was full of questioning, using tempo to create a feeling of suspense and terse disquiet, while the Andante started as a sparkling homage to Mendelssohn and ended with a dialogue between the piano trying to maintain the tender feeling and the strings evoking waves of foreboding, ending in uncertainty. The finale, using the same four-note motif that pervades all of the movements, was even more forceful and assertive than the first movement, but with a bold twist. The piano tried to provide a master narrative but was constantly undermined by the strings, producing a dark and mournful foreboding that culminated with an assertive statement of deep uncertainty from the piano. The performance was exciting, provocative and unsettling, a disquieting but valuable experience. The second half of the program was the Mendelssohn Piano Trio in C minor, Op. 66, and it was a total delight in every way, from start to finish. The playing was absolutely gorgeous, with sound quality Ive never heard before from a piano trio, subtle and supple, dramatic contrasts from fiery to languorous, a sweet flute-like purity from Soo-Jins violin, Soo-Kyungs dark brooding and moody cello, and Elvekjaers piano either leading a headlong rush or dramatically slowing the tempo to hold onto the tender moments. The opening Allegro, energetic and fiery, was turbulent and dramatic, starting with an upward struggle from the piano followed by a swift downward tumble; this restless up-and-down pattern is common to all three themes throughout the entire movement. The second movement, Andante, was played with infinite tenderness, as if trying to slow time to hold on to what is most precious. It was followed by a swift and nimble Scherzo quasi presto, at the same time delicate and steely, played with a whirlwind sense of mischief, strange textures from cello and violin providing freshness and edginess. Most delightful. The finale, Allegro Appasionato, started with a great yearning cello theme, taken up by assertive piano, unfolding with a piercing purity from violin, dark clouds from cello and sparkle from piano, with moments of magnificent density. The chorale theme eventually enveloped all, providing a vision of peace, embraced and accepted, but in this reading suffused with exploration and questioning. In response to a well-deserved ovation, they played a hauntingly beautiful and sensitive rendition of the Elegia third movement from Arenskys D-minor Piano Trio. By Leon Golub
CHAMBER DISC OF 2011 *****
CLASSIC FM MAGAZINE, UK
Thu, 2011-12-01
Not since the famous coupling of Isaac Stern and friends . . . have Mendelssohn's two piano trios been performed with such intensity on disc. If anything the Trio Con Brio goes one better with playing that caresses the lower end of the dynamic spectrum as much as it exalts in the music's climaxes. Every phrase soars and pulsates with the excitement of a fresh discovery as the Copenhagen players go the full distance with playing of skin-rippling sensitivity . . . Sensational playing from Korean sisters Soo-Jin Hong and Soo-Kyung Hong and Danish piano wizard Jens Elvekjaer.
Absolutely Gorgeous
Boston Musical Intelligencer
Mon, 2012-07-02
"The playing was absolutely gorgeous, with sound quality Ive never heard before from a piano trio, subtle and supple, dramatic contrasts from fiery to languorous, a sweet flute-like purity from Soo-Jins violin, Soo-Kyungs dark brooding and moody cello, and Elvekjaers piano either leading a headlong rush or dramatically slowing the tempo . . . infinite tenderness . . . freshness and edginess . . . moments of magnificent density . . . [a] reading suffused with exploration and questioning."
Mezmerizing
Worcester Telegram and Gazette
Tue, 2012-01-10
As in the previous year, Trio con Brio Copenhagen's playing was magically fused, technically impeccable, lushly toned or muscularly rasping as called foraltogether a mesmerizing, transporting listening experience.
Trio Con Brio sweeps listeners away
Salt Lake City Tribune
Tue, 2011-10-18
. . a memorable performance . . . The award-winning group, based in Denmark, played with intensity, virtuosic skill and a coherent interpretative arc that unified each work's musical content . . . The musicians' organic tonal blend and homogenous interpretative efforts generated a fascination that swept listeners away . . . 
Profound Musicianship
Peninsula Reviews, Monterey, CA
Fri, 2008-02-15
It was difficult to imagine any of the works played any better . . .profound musicianship . . . a magical new world of sensuous sound . . . so full of passion that it held you enthralled from beginning to end . . . The young musicians mingled with members of the audience in the lobby after the concert and seemed as charming off stage as on.
World Class
Kristeligt Dagblad
Fri, 2012-06-01
"The words 'world class' are easily uttered, can sound clichéd at times, and are clearly inadequate to describe what an other-worldly experience it was to hear Trio con Brio play on Wednesday evening. It was such a superb performance that analysis seems superfluous. The three outstanding musicians have, through their 13-year collaboration, conquered the technical challenges of their repertoire with so much to spare that they have all the time and space they need to refine their sound andcruciallyto penetrate to the essence of the music."
Convincing
Süddeutsche Zeitung
Sat, 2012-03-10
"[The trio] convinced as much by the technical mastery of their instruments as by their artistic expressiveness. Their brilliant and spirited rendition [of Brahms' Trio in C major] provoked tempestuous applause . . . a fabulous concert."
Nordic Cool Festival
Washington Post
Thu, 2013-03-14
Glowing reports hold true. The Trio Con Brio Copenhagen clearly occupies a lofty perch in todays musical scene. On Tuesday, the ensemble (violinist Soo-Jin Hong, cellist Mathias Beyer-Karlshoj and pianist Jens Elvekjaer) helped skyrocket the Kennedy Centers Nordic Cool festival toward its Sunday finish line with a concert of exquisitely wrought music at the centers Terrace Theater. Ravels ravishing Piano Trio followed a pair of evocative, fantasy-propelled works by Denmarks Bent Sorensen and Per Norgard. Mendelssohns compelling Piano Trio No. 2 in C Minor, Op. 66, capped the evening. The Nordic works were beautifully done. Sorensens Phantasmagoria, from 2007, wends an ambiguous way through textures of fleeting melodic motives, each instantly giving way to another in its microsecond of existence. Norgard based his Three Fragments (After a Dream) on an infinity row, creating a mathematical structure inherited from the 12-tone system. Composed last year, the piece consists of cascading fragments as soft as the tread of cat paws. The Copenhagen musicians ventured through these scores with airily skimmed piano keys matched by fleet, shimmering bows. The trio missed not a shade of Ravels multicolored exoticism  based on melodic ideas drawn from his Basque inheritance and touching on Asian scale systems. The musicians were totally in contact with one another, making their passionate fury even more intense and moments of shimmering playfulness all the more ebullient. Whether in its splashes of gentle lyricism or in its fiery energy, Mendelssohns Op. 66 is a close relative of his Songs Without Words for piano; the Copenhageners captured these contrasting moods with meticulous technique, sweetness of tone and sensitive engagement. By Cecelia H. Porter
Discography
Ravel - Dvorak - Bloch
Mendelssohn: Piano Trios
CDKlassisk.dk
Press Service

Photo: Søren Svendsen

Photo: Søren Svendsen

Photo: Søren Svendsen

Photo: Søren Svendsen

Photo: Søren Svendsen

Photo: Søren Svendsen

Photo: Søren Svendsen

Photo: Søren Svendsen

Photo: Søren Svendsen

Photo: Nikolaj Lund

Photo: Nikolaj Lund

Photo: Nikolaj Lund

Photo: Nikolaj Lund

Photo: Nikolaj Lund

Photo: Nikolaj Lund

Photo: Nikolaj Lund

Photo: Nikolaj Lund

Representation:
DK, SE, FI

Members:
  • Jens Elvekjær (Piano)
  • Soo-Kyung Hong (Cello)
  • Soo-Jin Hong (Violin)